Migraine

Migraine solutions from The Devon Clinic

Migraine is a neurological syndrome characterized by altered bodily perceptions, severe headaches, vomiting and nausea.

Effective Migraine treatments from The Devon Clinic:

 

Hypnotherapy

Reflexology

Aromatherapy

Sports Injury Rehabilitation

Indian Head Massage

Psychology

Personal Trainer

Nutritional Therapy

Face, neck & head massage

Physiotherapy

Acupressure

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Bowen Technique

Reiki

The Devon Clinic is pleased to offer Migraine treatments from the following local practitioner(s):

 Chris Fleet (Dip.Hyp. Adv D. hyp, GQHP) at New Devon Clinic

Chris Fleet (Dip.Hyp. Adv D. hyp, GQHP

 

Sue Young MIFL, MFHT, MISMA at New Devon Clinic

Sue Young MIFL, MFHT, MISMA

Deirdre Concannon (BSc DC) at New Devon Clinic

Deirdre Concannon (BSc DC)

Michael Potter at New Devon Clinic

Michael Potter

Joya Newcombe at New Devon Clinic

Joya Newcombe

Dr Ellis Kalmus BA(Hons), Clin.Psy.D., C.Psychol., AFBPsS. at New Devon Clinic

Dr Ellis Kalmus BA(Hons), Clin.Psy.D., C.Psychol., AFBPsS.

More About Migraine

Migraine is a neurological syndrome characterized by altered bodily perceptions, severe headaches, and nausea. Physiologically, the migraine headache is a neurological condition more common to women than to men. The word migraine was borrowed from Old French migraigne (originally as “megrim”, but respelled in 1777 on a contemporary French model). The French term derived from a vulgar pronunciation of the Late Latin word hemicrania, itself based on Greek hemikrania, from Greek roots for “half” and “skull”.

The typical migraine headache is unilateral (affecting one half of the head) and pulsating, lasting from 4 to 72 hours;[2] symptoms include nausea, vomiting, photophobia (increased sensitivity to light), and phonophobia (increased sensitivity to sound). Approximately one-third of people who suffer from migraine headaches perceive an aura—unusual visual, olfactory, or other sensory experiences that are a sign that the migraine will soon occur.

Initial treatment is with analgesics for the headache, an antiemetic for the nausea, and the avoidance of triggering conditions. The cause of migraine headache is unknown; the most common theory is a disorder of the serotonergic control system.

There are migraine headache variants, some originate in the brainstem (featuring intercellular transport dysfunction of calcium and potassium ions) and some are genetically disposed. Studies of twins indicate a 60 to 65 percent genetic influence upon their propensity to develop migraine headache. Moreover, fluctuating hormone levels indicate a migraine relation: 75 percent of adult patients are women, although migraine affects approximately equal numbers of prepubescent boys and girls; propensity to migraine headache is known to disappear during pregnancy, although in some women migraines may become more frequent during pregnancy.

Migraine is also sometimes known as:

  • Migraine
  • Headache
  • Tension
  • Stress
  • Neurological condition

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